Cosmology

Blog about cosmology

The 5 H.E.S.S. telescopes (Photo H.E.S.S., MPIK/Christian Foehr)

An article published in the journal “Physical Review Letters” describes a new interpretation of observations made with NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) observatory in Namibia. According to a team of Italian researchers led by Daniele Gaggero of the University of Amsterdam, at the center of the Milky Way there’s a kind of trap that focuses there some of the highest energy cosmic rays, the fastest particle of the galaxy.

Remnant of Supernova 1987A seen by ALMA (Image ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO); R. Indebetouw; NASA/ESA Hubble)

Two articles, one published in the journal “Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society” and one in the “Astrophysical Journal Letters”, describe different aspects of a research on the supernova 1987A (SN 1987A). Several researchers used the ALMA radio telescope discovering for the first time a series of molecules in the supernova remnants. This allowed to create a 3D map of what was called a dust factory and to find clues even about star birth.

A HSC-SSP image of a galaxy cluster (Image NAOJ/HSC Project)

At the end of February the first data from the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) were released to the public. It’s a kind of cosmic census created using a large digital camera installed on the Subaru Telescope. The National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) developed a dedicated database and interface to use the wealth of data collected. One hope is to be closer to understand the fate of the universe.

Artistic concept of the galaxy A2744_YD4 (Image ESO/M. Kornmesser)

An article to be published in the journal “The Astrophysical Journal Letters” describes a research about the galaxy A2744_YD4, the most distant observed with the ALMA radio telescope. A team of astronomers led by Nicolas Laporte of University College London also used the X-shooter instrument on ESO’s VLT to confirm that we’re seeing A2744_YD4 as it was about six hundred million years after the Big Bang. The most interesting thing is the dust detection indicating that there were already several supernovae.

Protoplanetary disk with a dust trap seen as a bright ring (Image courtesy Jean-Francois Gonzalez)

An article published in the journal “Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society” describes a research that provides an explanation for one of the last remaining mysteries about planet formation. An international team of researchers conducted a series of simulations that show that in the protoplanetary disk around a young star dust traps form that accelerate the aggregation of pebble-sized fragments from which planets are born.