Galaxies

Picture of the galaxy NGC 428 taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (Photo ESA/Hubble and NASA and S. Smartt (Queen's University Belfast))

A photograph of the galaxy NGC 428 taken by the Hubble Space Telescope shows its distorted and warped structure. Together with traces of a significant amount of stars being formed, it’s the sign of the merger between two galaxies. For this reason, its appearance could give us an idea of ​​what will happen in a few billion years to the Milky Way in its merger with Andromeda.

The appearance of a typical galaxy at different wavelenghts in the GAMA survey (Image ICRAR/GAMA and ESO)

An international team of astronomers examined the data of more than 200,000 galaxies at different electromagnetic wavelengths. The conclusion is that in a section of the universe the energy output today is about half compared to two billion years ago. In essence, the universe is dying but you need not worry because it’s an extremely slow process. This research was presented at the International Astronomical Union XXIX General Assembly and will be published in the journal “Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society”.

Gamma-ray burst map showing a ring 5 billion light years across (Image courtesy Lajos Balazs)

An article published in the journal “Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society” describes the discovery of what appears to the largest structure of the universe. It’s a ring of nine gamma-ray bursts, which means as many galaxies, for a length of 5 billions light years. This ring, though it’s not really a circle, seems to contradict the current models and in particular the cosmological principle, the idea that the distribution of matter in the universe is uniform at a large enough scale.

Artistic impression of the galaxy CR7 (Image ESO/M. Kornmesser)

An article accepted for publication in “The Astrophysical Journal” describes the discovery of a galaxy called CR7 seen as it was at the time of the early universe in which first-generation stars were found. This research was carried out mainly using ESO’s Very Large Telescope but data collected by the W. M. Keck Observatory, the Subaru Telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope were also used.

Galaxies containing quasars observed using the Hubble Space Telescope: in the top row the quasars are visible, in the bottom row the quasars' light is subtracted (Image NASA/ESA)

An article in the journal “Astrophysical Journal” describes a research conducted on quasars using the Hubble Space Telescope. These objects that are incredibly bright were observed in their formation phase, when they were in a sense teen-agers. The observations confirm the hypothesis that quasars are generated by galactic collisions that feed the supermassive black hole at their center.