Rover prototype developed at Carnegie Mellon University

Two of the team participating in the Google Lunar XPrize decided to join forces to work together to a journey to the Moon, scheduled for 2016. They’re the American group Astrobotic and the Japanese Hakuto, which a few weeks ago were among the winners of the Milestone Prizes, the intermediate awards in the competition. The two teams will share the cost of a journey that will begin atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and also the possible final prize they might win.

The MAVEN space probe during its test phase at Kennedy Space Center (Photo NASA/Jim Grossmann)

NASA’s MAVEN space probe successfully completed the first of five deep-dip maneuvers into the depths of Mars atmosphere. The purpose was to gather measurements closer to the lower limit of the upper layer of the red planet’s atmosphere. The periapsis, which is the lowest altitude point of the orbit, reached by MAVEN was 125 kilometers (78 miles).

The purpose of the space probe MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution), which reached the orbit of Mars on September 21, 2014, is precisely to study the red planet’s atmosphere. It’s much thinner than Earth’s one but is still a complex system. To understand its dynamics and its evolution over time, MAVEN is making continuous measurements and during the month started plunging into its depths.

The sky around the double star V471 Tauri, visible in low luminosity in the middle of the image (Image ESO/Digitized Sky Survey 2)

SPHERE (Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch) is an instrument built especially to take direct pictures of exoplanets but the first scientific article based on its observations was about the binary system V471 Tauri. A group of astronomers led by Adam Hardy carried out this research, published in the journal “Astrophysical Journal Letters”, explaining why it led to a surprise.

The astronomers expected that there was a brown dwarf orbiting this double star but SPHERE didn’t find anything. It’s a surprising result because the presence of a brown dwarf was by far the most plausible explanation for the strange behavior of V471 Tauri.

Two pictures of Ceres taken by NASA's space probe Dawn (Image NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

NASA’s Dawn spacecraft is approaching the dwarf planet Ceres. On February 12, 2015, when it was at a distance of about 83,000 kilometers (about 52,000 miles), it took some pictures that show us Ceres with a quality never seen before, allowing us to see its craters. The photos taken previously had puzzled scientists for the presence of some white spots but the new images don’t solve the mystery.

Photo of the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko taken by the Rosetta space probe on February 9, 2015 during its approach (Image ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM)

Last Saturday, ESA’s Rosetta space probe made a flyby just 6 kilometers (about 4 miles) away from the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which is becoming more and more active because the approach to the Sun is sublimating its water ice. This maneuver is an important moment in the Rosetta mission for the possible analyzes but also because it starts a new phase in which the probe will move away from the comet for its passage closest to the Sun in August 2015.

The Rosetta space probe’s flyby is the culmination of a series of maneuvers that started on February 4, 2015 when it abandoned the orbit in which he was flying, about 26 kilometers from the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Initially, Rosetta moved away from the comet until it was 142 kilometers (about 88 miles) away then it moved close again and to reach the minimum distance on February 14.