A moment of the PMM Leonardo relocation (Image NASA)

Yesterday, the International Space Station’s PMM (Permanent Multipurpose Module) Leonardo was moved: it used to be connected to the Unity module and was repositioned to be connected to the Tranquillity module. This operation is part of the Station’s extension that in the coming months will prepare the docking hatches for the new American spacecraft that should enter service in 2017.

Artistic concept of the space probe that will study Europa and its trajectory in the Jupiter's system (Image NASA/JPL-Caltech)

NASA announced the nine instruments selected for the space probe that will explore Europa, a large Jupiter’s moon. The interest in a mission of this type has grown over the years, since the Galileo space probe found evidence of the existence of Europa’s subsurface ocean. The new mission will try to determine whether that ocean contains life forms.

Image of the Medusa Nebula captures using the VLT telescope (Image ESO)

The most detailed image ever obtained of the Medusa Nebula was taken using ESO’s VLT (Very Large Telescope) in Chile. It reveals in a much better way the filaments of glowing gas that make it up. Those are snake-like filaments that led to the nickname Medusa with which is commonly known, inspired by the myth of the creature with snakes in place of hair. This nebula shows what might happen to the Sun some billion years in the future.

Artistic concept of the galaxy WISE J224607.57-052635.0 (Image NASA/JPL-Caltech)

An article published in the journal “Astrophysical Journal” describes the discovery of the brightest galaxy of the universe made using data from NASA’s space telescope WISE. Known as WISE J224607.57-052635.0, it emits light equivalent to that of over 300 trillion suns. It belongs to the ELIRG (Extremely Luminous Infrared Galaxy) class recently identified thanks to WISE.

Proton collisions send showers of particles through the ATLAS detector (Image courtesy ATLAS/CERN. All rights reserved)

CERN announced that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) successfully tested particle collisions at the highest energy level possible after its updates, 13 TeV (13 trillion electron volts). After the restart of the enormous particle accelerator took place at Easter, the energy levels were gradually increased and in Wednesday’s late night the collisions reached the maximum energy.