Dark energy

Blogs about dark energy

CMB Final Map (Image ESA/Planck Collaboration)

ESA presented the final map of the cosmic microwave background radiation created thanks to the Planck Surveyor space probe. This map shows what the universe was like before galaxies formed when it was about 380,000 years old. These are the results of the last processing of the collected data and now scientists are certain that the temperature and polarization are accurately determined. This final map confirms the standard model but also the inconsistency between the calculation of the Hubble constant based on those data and the one based on observation of the current universe.

Scheme of Hubble and Gaia at work (Image NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI))

An article published in the journal “The Astrophysical Journal” describes a new measurement of the expansion of the universe. A team of astronomers led by Nobel Prize winner Adam Riess combined observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope and those made with ESA’s Gaia space probe, an observatory that specifically aims to map billions of objects in the sky including the variable stars called Cepheid variable used for those measurements. The new results increase the accuracy but also the discrepancy between the measures of the expansion of the near universe and those of the early universe.

Dark Energy Survey's map (Image Chihway Chang/Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago/DES Collaboration)

The Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration presented a map of dark matter at the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields at Fermilab created using gravitational lensing effects from 26 million galaxies. These results show the composition of the recent universe and are very close to the predictions based on the map created upon measurements the primeval universe of ESA’s Planck Surveyor satellite.

Simulation of the large-scale structure of the universe (Image Nico Hamaus, Universitäts-Sternwarte München, courtesy of The Ohio State University)

An article accepted for publication in the journal “Physical Review Letters” describes a research on the distribution of matter in the universe made in a way different from usual. An international team of researchers studied cosmic voids as if they were photographic negatives from which they could get information about ordinary matter, dark energy and dark matter.

The galaxy UGC 9391 seen by the Hubble Space Telescope. Cepheid variable are in red circles, a type Ia supernova is marked by a blue cross (Image NASA, ESA, and A. Riess (STScI/JHU))

An article accepted for publication in “The Astrophysical Journal” describes a research based on observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope that suggests that the universe is expanding at a faster rate than expected. A team of astronomers led by Nobel laureate Adam Riess measured the distance of stars in nineteen galaxies with the best accuracy ever achieved to obtain this surprising result.